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Sock Monkey Comes Home to Rockford, Illinois

Sock Monkeys bring joy to our hearts. They bring out an inex­plic­a­ble desire to cud­dle them and love them. You just want to take every stray Sock Monkey home and give it a place to live.

Elvis Presley’s Style Showcased at Graceland Fashion Exhibit

The year-long cel­e­bra­tion of Elvis Presley’s 75th Birthday kicked into high gear on March 1 with the grand open­ing of “Elvis Presley: Fashion King,” at Graceland. The exhibit is the first of its kind at Elvis’ home in Memphis, and explores fash­ion trends ush­ered in by the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.

World War II Flight Nurses Exhibit Now Open at National Museum of the United States Air Force

A new exhibit focused on flight nurses dur­ing World War II opened March 3 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

Add “Spring” To Your Step In Chicago

Put away the warm win­ter clothes and say hello to spring­time in Chicago! Spring is the per­fect time to explore all that Chicago has to offer. With an array of activ­i­ties and events includ­ing art exhibits, sport­ing events and world-renowned the­ater, Chicago is in full bloom this season.

Missouri Travel Sites Rich in African-American History

Dred Scott. George Washington Carver. Scott Joplin. Buck O’Neil. You might be famil­iar with the names, but have you been to the cour­t­house where Scott, a slave, sat after he suc­cess­fully sued to earn his free­dom? Have you walked the grounds where Carver devel­oped his love for agri­cul­ture? Can you hear the music play as you imag­ine Joplin sit­ting at his piano and com­pos­ing “The Entertainer” or pic­ture what O’Neil’s accom­mo­da­tions might have been like for road games? If you answered “no” to these ques­tions, it’s time for a visit to Missouri, a state rich in African-American cul­ture and a great loca­tion to learn about the peo­ple who strug­gled to gain free­dom, fought to make con­tri­bu­tions to soci­ety, put their own stamp on a gen­er­a­tion and sim­ply wanted to get in the game. The Old Courthouse in St. Louis, www.nps.gov/jeff/planyourvisit/och.htm plays an impor­tant role in the his­tory of African-Americans in Missouri and in American history.

Dred Scott. George Washington Carver. Scott Joplin. Buck O’Neil. You might be famil­iar with the names, but have you been to the cour­t­house where Scott, a slave, sat after he suc­cess­fully sued to earn his free­dom? Have you walked the grounds where Carver devel­oped his love for agri­cul­ture? Can you hear the music play as you imag­ine Joplin sit­ting at his piano and com­pos­ing “The Entertainer” or pic­ture what O’Neil’s accom­mo­da­tions might have been like for road games? If you answered “no” to these ques­tions, it’s time for a visit to Missouri, a state rich in African-American cul­ture and a great loca­tion to learn about the peo­ple who strug­gled to gain free­dom, fought to make con­tri­bu­tions to soci­ety, put their own stamp on a gen­er­a­tion and sim­ply wanted to get in the game. The Old Courthouse in St. Louis, www.nps.gov/jeff/planyourvisit/och.htm plays an impor­tant role in the his­tory of African-Americans in Missouri and in American history.